BOOK IV - The Library of History

Bibliotheca historica
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Page 160 Bull's Back into Crete, and upon her begot Three Sons, Minos, Rhadomanthus, and Sarpedon.

Asterius King of Crete afterwards marry'd Europa, but having no Children of his own, he adopted the Sons of Jupiter, and left the Kingdom to them. Rhadamanthus prescrib'd Laws for the Cretians: Minos taking the Kingdom upon him, marry'd Itone, the Daughter of Lyctius, and of her begat Lycastes, who coming to reign, Marry'd Ida the Daughter of Corybantus, and of her begat another Minos, whom some say was the Son of Jupiter. He was the first of the Grecians that rigg'd out a gallant Navy, and gain'd the Dominion of the Sea. He marry'd Pasiphoe, the Daughter of Sol and Cretes, and by her had Deucalion, Astrea, Androgeus, Ariadne, and many other Children.

Androgeus in the Reign of Aegeus, went to Athens, to the Panathenean Solemnities, where he was Victor in all the Sports and Contests; upon which Account, he became very familiar with the Sons of Pallas; and thereupon Aegeus grew jealous, lest the House of Pallas, with the assistance of Minos, should out him of his Kingdom, and therefore contriv'd to cut off Androgeus. To which end, as he was travelling to Thebes to see a Sacred Procession by order of Aegeus, he was way-laid by some of the Country People, and assassinated near Oenon in Attica.

Minos afterwards hearing of the sad Misfortune of his Son, went to Athens, and requir'd Justice for the Murder committed: But seeing that he could not prevail, he proclaim'd War against the Athenians, and prayed Jupiter to send a Drought and Famine upon the City of Athens; whose Prayer was speedily heard, for forthwith there was a great Drought throughout Attica, and even through all Greece it self, together with a miserable Scarcity and dreadful Famine.

The chief Men therefore of the several Cities, assembling themselves together, sent to consult the Oracle at Delphos, what they must do in order to avert the present Calamity; who answer'd, that they were to go to Aeacus the Son of Jupiter, and Aegina the Daughter of Asopus, and intreat him to offer Sacrifices for them: Which they did accordingly, and Aeacus perform'd what they desir'd: Upon which the Drought and Famine ceas'd in all Parts of Greece, but only in Attica, and there it still continu'd; so that the Athenians were forc'd to resort again to the Oracle, to implore Relief from the pressing Calamity. Upon which, the God return'd Answer, that to expiate the Murder of Androgeus, they should give to Minos such satisfaction as he requir'd. The Athenians obey'd the Oracle; and Minos demanded, that for Seven Years together, they should send Seven Boys, and as many Girls to be devour'd by the Minotaur, and that this they should do as long as the Monster liv'd. The Athenians sent them accordingly, and so the Famine ceas'd, and Minos desisted from further prosecuting of the War. When the Seven Years were expir'd, Minos came again with a great Navy into the Coasts of Attica, and demanded Fourteen Boys, which were delivered him.

Theseus with the rest of the Children his Fellows, being now ready to set Sail, Aegeus sent a Pilot along with them, with Orders, that if Theseus overcame the Minotaur, that they should enter the Port of Athens with white Sails; but if he perish'd with black, as they us'd formerly to do.

When the Athenians arriv'd in Crete, Ariadna, Minos his Daughter, fell in love with Theseus for his gallant mean and deportment: Having therefore opportunity of Converse with her, by her Advice and Assistance, he both kill'd the Minotaur, and learn'd the Passage out of the Labyrinth, and so came out safe. Then privately preparing for his return into his own Country, he stole away Ariadna, and sail'd out of the Port in the Night, and arriv'd at the Island then call'd Dia, but now Naxos.

They report, that at that time Bacchus being taken with the Beauty of the Young Lady, took her by force from Theseus, and through the ardent Affection he had for her, marry'd her; and that his love for her was such, as that after her Death, he dignify'd her with Immortality, and transform'd her crown into



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