BOOK XVI - The Library of History

Bibliotheca historica
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Page 477

BOOK XVI.

IT's the Duty of all Writers of History, whether they Treat of the Actions of Kings,or of particular Cities, to relate the Whole from the Beginning to the Conclusion. For we conceive that hereby the History is both better remembred, and more clearly Understood. For imperfect Relations, without Knowledge of the Issue of what is begun, gives an unpleasant Check to the Diligent Reader's eager Expectation. But where the Matter is drawn down by a continu'd Thred to the end of the Narration; such Writings make the History compleat in all its Parts, but more especially, if the Nature of things done, do lead the Writer, as it were, by the Hand: This Course is by no means to be neglected.

Since therefore we are now come to the Affairs of Philip, Son of Amyntas, we according to the former Rule shall endeavour to comprehend in this Book all the Actions of this King. For he reign'd as King of Macedon Two and Twenty Years, who making use at the first but of small means, at length advanc'd his Kingdom to be the Greatest in Europe; and made Macedon (which at the time of his coming to the Crown was under the servile Yoke of the Illyrians) Mistress of many potent Cities and Countries. And through his Valour the Grecian Cities voluntarily submitted themselves to him, and made him General of all Greece. And having subduedthose that Robb'd and Spoil'd the Temple at Delphos, coming in aid of the God there, he was made a Member of the Senate of the Amphictyons; and for a Reward of his Zeal to the Gods, the Right of Voting in theSenate which belonged to the Phocians (whom he had overcome) was allotted to him.

After he had overcome the Illyrians, Paeones, Thracians, Scythians, and the Countries adjoyning to them, his Thoughts were wholly imploy'd how to destroy the Persian Monarchy: But after he had set free all the Grecian Cities; and was promised Forces to be raised for the Expedition into Asia, in the midst of all his preparations he was prevented by Death: But he left those, and so many more Forces behind him, that his Son, Alexander, had no occasion to make use of the Assistance of his Confederates in the Overturning of the Persian Empire. And all those things he did not so much by the Favour of Fortune, as by the Greatness of his own Valour. For this King excell'd most in the Art of a General, Stoutness of Spirit, and Clearness of Judgment and Apprehension. But that we may not in a Preface set forth his Actions before hand, we shall proceed to the orderly Course of the History, making first some short Remarks of the Times that went before.

CHAP. I.

Philip, an Hostage at Thebes, makes his Escape; Beats the Athenians; After makes Peace with them: Subdues the Paeones, and routs the Illyrians and makes Peace with them.

WHEN Callimedes was Archon at Athens, in the Hundred and Fifth Olympiad (in which Porus the Cyrenian was Victor) Cneius Genucius, and Lucius Aemilius, Roman Consuls, Philip the Son of Amyntas, and Father of Alexander, (who conquer'd the Persians) came to the Crown in the manner following.

Amyntas being brought under by the Illyrians, was forced to pay Tribute to the Conquerors; who having taken his youngest Son Philip as an Hostage, deliver'd him to be kept by the Thebans; who committed the young Youth to the Care of the Father of Epaminondas, with order to look to his Charge with all Diligence, and honourably to Educate and Instruct him.



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